STA Network Home

STA Front Page

Surfing The Apocalypse Network

Forum Index | News and Conversations | Log in | Register | Help
               

Surfing The Apocalypse is Reader Supported.

Please consider making a donation by clicking the button below.

 


 

 

Avatar

How Did the Romans Make Concrete That Lasts Longer Than Modern Concrete? The Mystery Finally Solved (STA BREAKING NEWS and ARCHIVES)

by Theresa @, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, 03:41

An explosion in recent years of so-called “ruin porn” photography has sparked an inevitable backlash for its supposed fetishization of urban decay and economic devastation. Documenting, as theorist Brian McHale writes, the “ruin in the wake of the deindustrialization of North American ‘Rust Belt’ cities” like Detroit, “ruin porn” shows us a world that only a few decades ago, thrived in a post-war economic boom that seemed like it might go on forever. Our morbid fascination with images from the death of American manufacturing offers a rich field for sociological inquiry. But when scientists look over what has happened to so much of the architecture from the early to mid-twentieth century, they’ve mostly had one very pressing question:

What is going on with the concrete?

Or more specifically, why do structures built only a few years ago look like they’ve been weathering the elements for centuries, when buildings thousands of years old, like many parts of the Pantheon or Trajan’s Markets in Rome, look like they’re only a few years old? The concrete structures of the Roman Empire, writes Nicole Davis at The Guardian, “are still standing more than 1,500 years after the last centurion snuffed it.” Roman concrete was a phenomenal feat of ancient engineering that until recently had stumped scientists who studied its durability. The Romans themselves “were aware of the virtues of their concrete, with Pliny the Elder waxing lyrical in his Natural History that it is ‘impregnable to the waves and every day stronger.”

FULL STORY

Share/Bookmark
  228 viewsreport

Complete thread:

 RSS Feed of thread

243644 Postings in 105335 Threads, 514 registered users, 103 users online (0 registered, 103 guests)
RSS Postings  RSS Threads | Contact
Privacy Policy | Home | Main | Index